Today is “Don’t Fry Day!” The Friday before Memorial Day is coined “Don’t Fry Day” in hopes that people will take the extra precautions to practice safe sun protection habits. It’s the weekend when many of us will be hitting the beaches, having picnics at the park and just enjoying the outdoors and long holiday weekend. Keep you and your family safe and let the world know you are by taking the “Don’t Fry Day” Pledge!

Here are some great sun protection tips from the Skin Cancer Prevention website:

Do Not Burn.

  • Avoid intentional tanning.
  • Avoid tanning beds.

Ultraviolet light from the sun and tanning beds causes skin cancer and wrinkling.  If you want to look like you’ve been in the sun, consider using a sunless self-tanning product, but continue to use sunscreen with it.

Generously Apply Sunscreen to all exposed skin using a Sun Protection Factor (SPF) of at least 15 that provides broad-spectrum protection from both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays.  Re-apply every two hours, even on cloudy days, and after swimming or sweating.

Wear Sun Protective Clothing such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, where possible.

Seek Shade when appropriate, remembering that the sun’s rays are the strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Use Extra Caution Near Water, Snow, and Sand as they reflect the damaging rays of the sun which can increase your chance of sunburn.

Get Vitamin D Safely through a healthy diet that includes vitamin supplements.  Don’t seek the sun.

“Don’t Fry Day” also marks the end of National Skin Cancer Awareness Month. You still have until May 31st to place your UV Skinz order to receive a complimentary Special Edition “What’s a Sunburn”  baby skinz swim shirt! Go to the UV Skinz Facebook fan page and share what special child or organization you gifted your baby skinz to!

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Melanoma Monday

The American Academy of Dermatology designates the first Monday in May–Melanoma Monday. Its simple purpose is to increase public awareness about Melanoma. Melanoma is a very aggressive form of skin cancer and occurs when uncontrolled growth of pigment producing cells spread rapidly to other areas of the body. Melanoma is less common than other skin cancers, but if not detected early it is 75% more deadly.

Facts:

  • Over 2 million cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed this year.
  • One in five Americans will contract skin cancer during their lives.
  • While many common cancer rates are falling, the melanoma rate continues to grow at a rate faster than that of any of the seven most common cancers. Between 1992 and 2004, melanoma incidence increased 45%.
  • One bad sunburn in childhood doubles the risk of melanoma later in life.
  • Those who use tanning beds a handful of times per year in their youth risk up to a 75% higher likelihood of developing melanoma in their lifetimes.

No tan is worth your life!

What can you do today?

  1. Find a free skin cancer screening in your area!
  2. Learn and practice healthy sun-protection habits–everyday! A few easy ones to remember are; seek shade during 10am-4pm when the sun is at its highest point, wear sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30, gear-up with a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses and uv-protective clothing.
  3. Conduct your own regular Skin Cancer Self-Exam:

selfExam

 

4. Wear traditional black or…

 

Currently, there is a lot of controversy over what color to wear today to honor those battling Melanoma and our Melanoma Angels. Some people will choose to wear black (the traditional color of Melanoma awareness) and some people will choose to wear orange. Wearing orange is the color being promoted by the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD)  for their SPOT Orange on Melanoma Monday campaign. For those who traditionally honor their loved ones with black it has come as an insult to the Melanoma community, but the AAD is hoping that the bright orange color will really call attention and bring awareness to a disease that has claimed so many lives. It is your choice to wear black or orange, or both!

 Bringing awareness to the signs and prevention of Melanoma and skin cancer is the ultimate goal. 

UV Skinz 6th Annual “My First Skinz” Campaign in Honor of Skin Cancer Awareness Month

Today marks the start of our 6th Annual “My First Skinz” Campaign in honor of  National Skin Cancer Awareness Month. You will probably hear a lot about how to protect yourself from this treatable disease. You will see a lot of pictures and diagrams about the statistics of skin cancer and the signs to look for. You will most likely be told to cover-up, wear sunscreen, stay out of the sun at certain times of the day. It is true that just one childhood sunburn can more than double your chances of developing skin cancer in adulthood. More than 73% of skin cancer deaths are from Melanoma and more than 3.5 million skin cancers diagnosed on over 2 million people each year.

Despite all of the facts, warnings and statistics–we want to give you more. We want to give you a way to help teach and give the gift of sun protection to the ones who matter the most, children. UV Skinz is proud to provide worry-free alternatives for sun protection. This month our gift to every one who places an order during the month of May is a “What’s a Sunburn” My First Skinz Baby UV protective swim shirt.  Rhonda Sparks, Founder of UV Skinz, truly believes that healthy sun protection habits should begin early and be taught daily. When Rhonda lost her husband to melanoma in 2001, leaving her with three small boys, it was their future health and happiness that led Rhonda to found UV Skinz. Ever since, UV Skinz has never lost sight of the goal to get kids covered. Teaching our children good sun-safety habits is important so that they continue these practices into adulthood. UV Skinz makes it easy with comfortable, high-quality, and stylish swim shirts.

what's a sunburn_UV Skinz

 “The free baby swim shirt giveaway gets families in the early habit of making sure their children have adequate sun protection – not just through sunscreen, which can be irritating to skin – but through our UV swim shirts and UPF 50+ clothing,” says company founder, Rhonda Sparks.

Remember for every order placed during May you will find our special edition “What’s A Sunburn” Baby Skinz inside your package! Please pay-it-forward by donating this shirt to a child so they will never know what a sunburn is. There will be a flyer within each order asking for you to pass along the Baby Skinz to a needy organization; your local women’s shelter, red cross, maternity ward, mommies group, a friend or family member. The possibilities are endless!  We would love to hear where the Baby Skinz end up!

If you would like to know more about the campaign feel free to email info@uvskinz.com, call 1-877-887-5468.

 

Prevention News: Teens Create A Sunscreen Reminder

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These two New Zealand teens have created a visual reminder to reapply sunscreen in hopes that their efforts will raise awareness about skin cancer and Melanoma.  Danielle Watt and Sarah Mount are participating in a school program called Young Enterprise. Taking sun safety into their own hands they created the Exposure Band, which looks like a rubber watch. The Exposure Band is a sensor that changes color when the wearer needs to apply more sunscreen. When the wearer applies sunscreen to their skin they also apply the same amount to the face of the band. As the sunblock wears off of the skin and the band the Exposure Band changes color (from white to bright yellow) alerting the user that it is time to reapply! The bands come in 7 colors and are made for kids and adults. For now these bands are only being sold on their Facebook page. The teens will be donating the sales to the Skin Cancer Foundation. (Source: Brisbane Times)

This cause hits close to home because they have both known someone diagnosed with Melanoma and live in a place where skin cancer is the most common cancer. In New Zealand, new skin cancers total about 67,000 per year, compared to a total of 16,000 for all other types of cancer. There is a one in 17 chance that a person from New Zealand will develop Melanoma. It is not just affecting older people, but it is quickly becoming a young persons disease–Melanoma is the most common type of cancer for 25–44 year old males (17 deaths in 2004) and 15–24 year old females (12 deaths in 2004). (Source: Science Learning)

Many people believe that putting their sunscreen on once a day will protect them from skin damage, UV exposure and ultimately skin cancer. This is not true. Sunscreen must be reapplied at least every two hours, less when in and out of the water. Wearing a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses, UV protective clothing and avoiding the peak hours of the day are also other ways to protect your skin from sun damage, sunburn and skin cancer.

Wearing Exposure Bands would be a fun way to keep track of sun exposure and a subtle reminder to reapply sunscreen.  Children would especially benefit from this product; giving them independence in their own sun safety with less nagging from Mom to put on more sunscreen!

Would you wear one?